Get Your Organization On Board

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It's day 8 of the Celebrate Civility challenge.

Today's tip is to get your organization on board.

Start conversations at work about ways your hospital or organization can help eradicate bullying. Consider talking to your supervisor about this as well.

Want to do more? Here are a few more ideas: 
 

  • Form a Civility or Organizational Culture Team. Team members can meet occasionally to come up with bonding activities for staff, ways to address incivility or bullying, and attend conferences or seminars to learn new ways to address the issue. 
  • Raise awareness about bullying, so all employees can take steps to prevent it.
  • Help nurses understand that bullying one another also affects patient safety 
  • Teach staff members how to address these incidents. Practice preventing and addressing incivility and bullying using role-playing, simulation, and managing the uncivil encounter in real time. 
  • Have a zero-tolerance policy for staff members who aren’t willing to change bullying behaviors.
  • Write a code of ethics for your organization or even just your unit. 
  • Use the Civility Index Dashboard from Dr. Edmonson’s Civility Toolkit or the Healthy Work Environment Inventory© developed by Dr. Clark to understand the level of civility at your organization or unit. Use the data to track your progress. 
  • Help ensure hospitals and organizations take all reports of bullying and violence seriously.
  • Consider implementing a code word for bullying. Hospitals use code words like “code blue” for cardiac arrest. Have a code word that can be announced when nurses feel they are being threatened. It’s a way nurses can alert their colleagues to the issue, but not the general public.


ANA's position statement, Incivility, Bullying, and Workplace Violence provides comprehensive recommendations for nurses and their employers on how to prevent, address, and mitigate incivility, bullying, and violence in the workplace and establish a culture of safety and respect. 

Let us know how your organization is addressing issues of incivility and bullying. Share your stories with us in our discussion or in our Facebook group.

Find this helpful? Use the social media links on the left side of your page to share it with a nurse and invite them to join Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation! Join us on day 9.

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Posted by Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation (HNHN) on Aug 1, 2018 7:38 AM America/Chicago

Blog Post Comments

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I 100% agree abbyeed‍! and I love the code word idea! When I worked retail we had a code word for customers that we thought were suspicious and it was a causal easy phrase to drop into a conversation. It helped our team to identify issues and kept the general public free from needing to be worried about an issue that did not really concern them. 
  • Posted Fri 20 Dec 2019 04:56 PM CST
Theses are all great tips! I particularly love the last one "consider implementing a code word for bullying. Hospitals use code words like “code blue” for cardiac arrest. Have a code word that can be announced when nurses feel they are being threatened. It’s a way nurses can alert their colleagues to the issue, but not the general public." This can be taught to employees upon hire or during new employee orientation. I also agree that bullying does affect patient safety. If the patient hears or sees the nurse bullying a co-worker then the patient may seem scared or hesitant to the nurse.
  • Posted Mon 16 Dec 2019 04:32 PM CST

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